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Etiquette SG x Sayoni present The Vagina Monologues
Written by sayoni   
Monday, 22 April 2013 03:39

Last year's reading brought down the house, thanks to our talented activists and enthusiastic audience. This year, Etiquette SG will bring The Vagina Monologues to greater heights together with Sayoni at The Arts House Chamber (i.e. where parliament used to sit).


The Vagina Monologues

Description
In this rendition of Eve Ensler’s iconic
The Vagina Monologues, 14 Singapore-based woman activists from myriad sectors of civil society come together for a community reading of the script.

In the tradition of V-Day, an event aimed at bringing to light issues pertaining to violence against women, this event is an amateur reading meant as a platform for the voices of non-actors and to reach out to local communities.

The women reading this version of the play work in various fields of social change that span issues of gender equality, sexual violence, animal welfare, queer rights, migrant worker rights, sex worker rights, issues of media representation and issues pertaining to the death penalty.


Get your tickets from Bytes! We hear they're selling fast, so don't wait too long!

Last Updated on Monday, 22 April 2013 03:46
 
ASEAN SOGI Caucus: We are ASEAN
Written by sayoni   
Tuesday, 09 April 2013 13:45

We, the ASEAN SOGI Caucus[i] are deeply outraged and concerned by the decision of the National Organizing Committee (NOC) of Brunei Darussalam's to restrict discussions and limit civil society spaces at the ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ ASEAN People’s Forum 2013 (ASCS/APF) for selective groups of people whose opinions and views are not aligned with the state's views, namely sexual orientation and gender identity and gender expression (SOGIE), sex work, sexual and reproductive health rights.

 

We are disappointed that even in spaces that are meant to foster and uphold democracy and human rights principles by and for civil society organizations, specific sectors of society are being discriminated against and are restricted.

 

People of diverse sexual orientation and gender identity as well as sex workers and advocates of sexual and reproductive rights are banned and given conditions from organizing educational workshops that promote understanding and address the human rights violations that we are subjected to because of our identity and orientation.

 

We strongly believe that the invisible hand of the state in policing civil society spaces is highly unacceptable, and if such policing continues the ASCS/APF will no longer be a relevant space for civil society. We strongly urge the ACSC/APF to immediately address and correct this matter.

 

We are at the stage in our struggle for equality and respect that we will not accept discrimination, abuse and violence or state sanction as a part of our existence by the denial of our rights and our humanity.

It is in this spirit of pride and dignity that we are reclaiming our rightful space in our respective countries and in our region, and we demand our governments to:

1.Immediately repeal laws that directly and indirectly criminalize SOGI, recognizes LGBTIQ rights as human rights, and harmonizes national laws, policies and practices with the Yogyakarta Principles.

 

2.Establish national level mechanisms and review existing regional human rights instruments (e.g. AICHR, ACWC) to include the promotion and protection of the equal rights of all people regardless of SOGI with the active engagement of the LGBTIQ community.

 

3.Depathologize SOGI and promote psychological well being of people of Diverse SOGI in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) standards, and ensure equal access to health and social services.

 

We urge the ACSC/APF 2013 to correct and apologize for the discriminatory and regressive action that grossly disrespected our basic human rights as members of the ASEAN community. We call on members of society to support our call for a TRULY INCLUSIVE and a REAL ACSC/APF that protects and promotes the human rights of ASEAN peoples regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity as well as socio-economic background.

 



[i] The ASEAN Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Caucus or known as “ASEAN SOGI Caucus” is a network of people who respect and promote the human rights of people regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression (SOGIE)

 

ASEAN SOGI Caucus – [email protected]

 
Participants Wanted for Focus Group
Written by sayoni   
Wednesday, 27 March 2013 02:44

 participants-wanted-for-focus-group


Sayoni is hosting a 3-hour group discussion to understand LGBT persons' recent experiences of Singaporean secondary schools. The information collected will not be identifiable. If you are aged 16 to 21, and would like to participate, please register your interest here. Your participation will contribute toward an SMU student paper and, potentially, future advocacy by Sayoni.

For enquiries or if you prefer to speak to us privately, please email Xiu Xuan at [email protected].

She is supervised by Kelly Then, who can be contacted at [email protected].

Last Updated on Saturday, 30 March 2013 22:57
 
To Singapore’s LGBT Community and Friends
Written by jean   
Wednesday, 30 January 2013 10:32

 

To Singapore’s LGBT Community and Friends,

Recent events have caused much grief to many of us. Issues surrounding being LGBT are once again cast in the limelight and being discussed in the media. Hateful words have been used, disinformation has been spread as fact, and our leaders' positions do not appear to be evolving. While many of us are understandably hurt, even angered, by some insensitive comments that have been made, and there is fear that justice and equality may not prevail, it is important that we stay rational and keep calm.

There will be little to be gained from responding to vitriol with more vitriol. In the words of Gandhi, “Anger and intolerance are the enemies of correct understanding.” Let us not devolve into the very image of the angry and intolerant, whose hearts and minds we ought to win over through love and kindness. Misinformation is best countered rationally, with facts.

At times like this, it is especially difficult for those of us who are not yet ‘out’ and feel like we are living with stigma on our own. The issue may be debated among our peers – at the workplace, in school or in National Service – or even with family members at home. It may be placing undue pressure on those of us who fear being ‘outed’ if we simply took a stand.

Remember, you are not alone. There is a strong community of people – straight and LGBT – who understand what you are going through. It is important that we lend support to one another at this difficult time. While the resources are few, they are available, thanks to the efforts of our own community. You can find links to some of them below.

Last Updated on Friday, 27 June 2014 03:46
 
Why We Made a Police Report
Written by Kelly   
Sunday, 13 January 2013 16:16




Following our meeting with the Minister, many comments were made in public and in private.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but one comment on our website stood out. The comment started off promising, recognising the typical social roles and contributions of queer persons. It quickly degenerated into a vulgar and violent threat of severe physical assault. When a person incites violence against a minority, whether they are ethnic, religious or sexual minorities, it becomes hate speech.

We decided to make a police report because we are vulnerable, not just as individuals, but as a community. Many queer persons receive threats from persons they know or strangers, at school, in National Service or in casual, social settings. For some who look different, it is a common occurrence. Threats or acts of violence are usually under-reported, but by persons of stigmatised identities, even more so, because they face additional stigma and repercussions.

Hate speech can escalate into hate crime. The recent report in The New Paper about a gang rape is an example of a hate crime, where a person is targeted because they are perceived to be of a particular social group.

As a society, we need to signal that such threats and acts are not acceptable. They offend public decency and are unjust. We would like to encourage everyone to stand up against threats and violence, whether you are a survivor or a bystander.

Stay tuned for updates.

Last Updated on Sunday, 13 January 2013 16:41
 
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